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Volume 39, Issue 12
Publication date: June 1, 2014
Expiration date: June 1, 2017

Women's Sexual Health and Wellness
Leah S. Millheiser, MD (Moderator)
Clinical Assistant Professor and Director, Female Sexual Medicine Program, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California

Alyssa Dweck, MD
Attending Physician, Mount Kisco Medical Group, Northern Westchester Hospital, Mount Kisco; Assistant Clinical Professor, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York

Michael L. Krychman, MD
Executive Director, Southern California Center for Sexual Health and Survivorship Medicine, Newport Beach, California

Learning Objectives
After completing this activity, the physician should be better able to:
1. Recognize both the physiologic and psychological factors that may contribute to the development of female sexual dysfunction.
2. Integrate effective sexual-history taking techniques into a clinical practice.
3. Identify the impact of various contraceptive options on female sexual function.
4. Describe the physical and hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy and postpartum which can affect female sexual functioning.
5. Recommend behavioral changes to patients in order to improve relationship intimacy following childbirth.
6. Recognize which patients are appropriate candidates for a referral to sex therapy.
7. Recommend appropriate treatment options for dyspareunia caused by vulvovaginal atrophy in breast cancer survivors.


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